Archive for the ‘baby wearing’ Category

Everyday Babywearing Challenge – Day 9

July 21, 2014

Today was the final day of the #onlyneedone challenge. The short cross carry with ring finish served us well again today. The cashier at the restaurant we ate lunch at asked about my wrap because she’s expecting. There was a line, so I gave her a short answer, then later went back and gave her information about the “Everyday Babywearing” group on Facebook. What’s funny is that when she first saw me and asked, I had the wrap on without the baby. Hubby had carried him in from the car. She still knew what it was.

This challenge showed my that even though it’s not the nicest wrap, a simple DIY wrap of medium length can serve well for most situations. I wasn’t home much so didn’t get to practice back carries much, but I know they’re doable. The wrap I used for the challenge cost me about $20 in materials, plus an optional ring for about $5. It took a couple of hours labor to measure, wash, iron, cut and hem it. The real woven wraps that are made specifically for carrying babies are smoother and prettier, but also cost at least four times as much, but one simple one can get the job done.

When the DIY version will function well enough, do you still seek out the nicer professional version?

Everyday Babywearing Challenge – Day 8

July 20, 2014

Today I saw another woman wearing her baby in a wrap. I was wearing Baby C in a short cross carry with a ring finish. We exchanged smiles from across the waiting area. Iwas in line so couldn’t go talk to her. Later I was in a public restroom changing his diaper and a woman from Africa struck up a conversation with me about how women in her country wear their babies, but on their backs. She thought the front carry looked interesting and comfortable as well. I left the restroom smiling so much that Hubby was curious of the reason.

Are there any topics that you will approach and talk to strangers about?

Focused on Success 30 Day Challenge – Day 33, Everyday Babywearing Challenge – Day 6

July 18, 2014

I was moderately active today, but wouldn’t call it exercise. I ate somewhat well. We had a delayed start to the day, so breakfast was really brunch. I had a diner salad and fries. A little bit later I had the leftover pizza. Dinner was Indian food with friends. I had the last of my coconut ice cream for desert. I drank around four bottles today.

What do you like to eat with friends?

I wore Baby C in a strap carry for a short nap this morning. While we were visiting friends I wore him in a short cross carry with a slip knot. One of the friends was actually familiar with the practice of South American baby wearing in woven wraps.

Who wants to get me a genuine woven wrap?

Flats and Handwashing Challenge – Day 2

May 12, 2014

 

Check out the rules here!

Check out the rules here!

The Flats and Handwashing Challenge is an annual event started in 2011 by DirtyDiaperLaundry.com  to raise awareness about how cloth diapering can be done economically and with minimal resources by almost anyone. Cloth diapering can allow families to allocate more resources to food and other necessities, without worrying about affording a product that is literally designed to be thrown out.

Day 2: My Flat Diaper “Stash” and what it cost

All my flats (except a few dirty & on baby,)and  covers except the one on baby.

All my flats (except a few dirty & on baby,)and covers except the one on baby.

For the challenge I am using about 36 birdseye flat diapers. They were purchased at different times, but the average cost was about $2.10/each. Half are OsoCozy unbleached flats, and half are Imagine unbleached flats. I am also using nine Diaper Safari covers which are $8.95/each but often are (and were purchased when ) on sale for buy 2 get one free, making each one come out to just under $6 each.

Showing the inside of one of the covers, as well as my pins and Snappi. You might be able to see a bit of the size difference between the Osocozy flat (on top) and the Imagine flat (on the bottom.)

Showing the inside of one of the covers, as well as my pins and Snappi. You might be able to see a bit of the size difference between the Osocozy flat (on top) and the Imagine flat (on the bottom.)

I also will be using  two diaper pins that were $0.75 each, a Snappi which was about $3, and cloth wipes that were made from old t-shirts that I cut up, so were free. I’m also using a bucket and plunger that I purchased new in our rural hardware store for about $15 as a washer, and my usual laundry detergent. That brings the total cost, not counting detergent or water (which are the only things that need constant replenishment) to $149.10. I honestly probably am using more flats and covers than are necessary, but $150 isn’t bad for diapering a baby full time for 2 years or so. A couple months disposables and wipes would easily cost that.

Flats Handwashing Challenge (9)

Oh! I did forget to add in the wipes solution that I’m using. I made wipe cubes with a bar of Dr. Bronner’s baby soap, coconut oil, lavender oil, and melaleuca oil, and while I don’t have what the cost on that was, I know that it made over 50 cubes, and a cube makes about 8 oz of wipes solution, which lasts me at least a few weeks the way I use it. I spritz the bottom, then wipe dry with a cloth wipe. Plain water, or water with a drop of your favorite baby wash are less expensive alternatives.

The OsoCozy flats when prepped have less even edges than the Imagine flats. There’s about a 3″ difference in the sides, where the Imagine flats only have about 1″ difference between the sides. For the most part this doesn’t matter, but for folds that require a square, it takes a bit of finagling to get it to work. The Diaper Safari covers have generous pockets at the front and back for tucking a flat into if you prefer not to pin the diaper on, yet they’re also generously sized enough to go over a doubled up diaper that’s pinned on. Later in the week I’ll share what folds I’ve used and why I like each of them.

My bucket and plunger "camp washer."

My bucket and plunger “camp washer.”

So far I started using the flats around 10pm Saturday night, and at 4:30pm on Sunday I was washing 10 flats, 2 covers, and 3 wipes. Since the flats dry within a few hours hanging on our drying rack, and assuming 3 more changes in a 24 hour period (to be generous) that equals 14 flats/24 hours, add half a day for drying is 21 flats, and maybe 3-4 covers (depending on the poop schedule. Today we only had one messy one.) I suppose I should mention that my little guy is not quite 5 months old, is a heavy wetter in the early morning hours, and a moderate wetter during the day. He is also exclusively breast fed.

I was a little bit worried about this starting on Mother’s day, but it ended up being fine. I usually change most of the diapers anyway, so that was no different. Since Hubby and Baby made my meals, and I mostly got to just relax, fitting in the washing was easy. I think it can fit in during the week too even after Hubby is at work and I’m working from home and getting other things done. We’ll see how the week goes!

What does your cloth diapering stash look like and what did it cost? Share in the comments!

To read other people’s experiences with the challenge, check out DirtyDiaperLaundry.com’s post and the link-up at the bottom of her post.

Flats and Handwashing Challenge – Day 1

May 11, 2014

 

Check out the rules here!

Check out the rules here!

The Flats and Handwashing Challenge is an annual event started in 2011 by DirtyDiaperLaundry.com  to raise awareness about how cloth diapering can be done economically and with minimal resources by almost anyone. Cloth diapering can allow families to allocate more resources to food and other necessities, without worrying about affording a product that is literally designed to be thrown out.

Day 1:  Why Am I Taking the Challenge?

When I first heard about the “Flats and Handwashing Challenge” last year, I was intrigued. Since cloth diapering is definitely about cost for us (as well as keeping chemicals away,) I was glad to hear that people do cloth diaper so inexpensively. I also tend to be crafty, so I’m not intimidated by having to fold fabric to fit on a baby. When I was a child we’d occasionally use “whatever was available” flats on my brothers (and my mother probably did the same for me too!)

My little guy is now about 5 months old, and we’ve been cloth diapering most of the time. We did get some pocket diapers, prefolds, and a few miscellaneous diapers, which we use most of the time, but we also have a bunch of birdseye flats. We use them to stuff the pockets, and also folded onto the baby, especially after a bath to let his bottom dry without risking a shower of another kind!

The hardest parts of this challenge for me will be the middle of the night diaper changes, and the hand washing. I don’t think they’ll be so difficult as to prevent me from continuing with the challenge, but we’ll see!

I hope to see how feasible it is to cloth diaper with just the flats, covers, pins (or Snappi,) and hand washing. I know many families who are on a very tight budget that could save a lot of money by cloth diapering. I’ve also seen so many articles about people trying to reuse disposables because they can’t afford to buy more.  I can’t counter the “it’s too hard” comment if I haven’t done it myself, since we’re currently blessed enough to have a working washer and dryer, as well as “easier” cloth diapers. (I do hang dry most of my diapers most of the time anyway, but we don’t have to.)

Have you ever had to make do with what you had on hand for diapering? Have you ever cloth diapered while hand washing? Share your experiences in the comments.

To read other people’s experiences with the challenge, check out DirtyDiaperLaundry.com’s post and the link-up at the bottom of her post.

Before and After Having a Baby (1)

April 24, 2014

Since becoming a mommy, there are some random things that I’ve noticed that no one mentions about having children. I’ll be posting about these things now and then.

The first one I noticed has to do with baby wearing. It has been my intent all along to have the baby in a carrier, on me, in order to get things done throughout the day. When he was a bitty baby it was also one of the best ways to get him to nap. This means he was in the carrier a good portion of daylight hours. If you aren’t familiar with baby wearing, especially infant baby wearing, picture a baby shoved down the front of your shirt with his head sticking out…his forehead just about at your chin level.

Now…since he’s there most of the day, that means if you want to eat, you’ll be eating over his head. What no one told me, was that you’d need to avoid dropping crumbs on the baby’s head. (This also applies to eating while nursing the baby…since this is how he spends a lot of the time that he’s not sleeping.) So many foods that we think of as “easy” suddenly AREN’T.

  • Soup, Stew, and Chili – easy to make, easy to reheat, not easy to eat without dripping onto the baby…unless it’s a “drinkable” soup…but that’s not how I like my soup!
  • Salad – requires no cooking, but fluffy leaves don’t get onto forks well when you can’t brace the bowl with your other hand (when nursing) and like to pop off the fork anyway. Dressing also likes to drip off the leaves.
  • Chips (of any sort) – aren’t exactly the healthiest food choice, but when you’re desperate! I remember how I used to like to find the largest chips that were whole. Now, those large chips mean I have to break the chip to get it into my mouth…which means crureciperecipembs on the baby. The small , broken chips are now my friends.
  • Sandwiches – unless you cut them into bite sized pieces (that fit all at once in your mouth) you’re dealing with crumbs again!
  • Cereal – cold cereal is drippy, hot cereal is hot and blobby.
  • Tacos – Forget it!

So…I’ve learned to eat mostly acceptable foods with low dripping or crumbling rates. Like what? Anything that can be popped into your mouth in one bite without dripping.

  • Almond Bites – frozen yumminess without drips. Perfect! What do you mean they aren’t nutritious? They are made from almonds…it’s right in their name!
  • Tater Tots – baked bites of potato goodness. Of course they’re so processed they have almost no fiber or nutrition left in them, but they taste good alone, or to be gourmet, dipped in almost any condiment!
  • A “cereal” that I’ve concocted that is so thick it stays on the spoon. (Recipe below.)
  • Fruits and veggies that either are already bite sized (like grapes and mandarin orange segments,) or that I’ve found time to chop into bite sized pieces. Bonus if I have something to dip them in! (Usually hummus…for veggies anyway.)
  • Homemade granola bars made bite sized.
  • You’ll get used to eating this way, and then when you get to eat without the baby being in the drip and crumb zone…with both hands…and utensils…you’ll think it’s wonderful! (Even if it’s just quinoa pasta with tomato sauce.)

    Amy’s Cereal
    For a single serving use tablespoons as the measurement, but I usually use cups as the measure, then about one cup of the mixture is a serving. I use all raw ingredients, but I didn’t see why toasted wouldn’t also work if that’s what you have or prefer.
    Ingredients

  • 2 parts pepitas
  • 2 parts hemp seed
  • 2 parts chia seed
  • 2 parts ground flax seed
  • 2 parts ground sesame seed
  • 2 parts shredded coconut
  • 5 parts gluten free oats (Optional. If omitted, use 2/3 cup total as a serving.)
  • Directions
    Combine all ingredients. To serve, combine 1 cup or one serving of the cereal mixture with 1 cup of water. (If omitting the oats use 3/4 cup water.) Let soak for 10-20 minutes, or longer. Add sweetener, fruit, or other toppings you like. I like to add raisins and freeze dried fruit. The longer it sits, the thicker it gets. Feel free to add more water if it ends up thicker than you like. (You can also use any other thin liquid such as rice milk or apple juice. Whatever you like!) I usually store the dry mix in the fridge because the seeds, especially flax, can go rancid so easily.